Horny women in Anderson

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The e-mail addresses that you supply to use this service will not be used for any other purpose without your consent. Create a link to share a read only version of this article with your colleagues and friends. Please read and accept the terms and conditions and check the box to generate a sharing link. One hundred and seventeen college men viewed a Facebook profile with either a sexualized profile photo or a nonsexualized profile photo of a young woman and then evaluated the profile owner.

They also reported on their dating attitudes. indicated that the sexualized profile owner was considered less physically attractive, less socially appealing, and less competent to complete tasks. Interest in dating and casual sex with the profile owner as well as general dating attitudes were largely not impacted by the type of profile photo. Findings suggest that using a sexualized profile photo on Facebook comes with some relational costs for young women. Strategies for educating young people about new media use and sexualization are discussed.

Youth today are growing up in an unprecedented media environment. On average, young people ages 8—18 spend 7. Given that they are typically multitasking and engaging with more than one type of media at once, the amount of content they are exposed to is close to 11 hr per day 10 hr, 45 min. A highly popular type of media in the lives of young people is social media. Similar patterns are true for young adults ages 18—29; Perrin, Accordingly, the content of media and its effects on young viewers should be of concern to parents, educators, and society in general.

One noticeable pattern in the content of traditional media such as television, movies, and magazines is the consistent portrayal of girls and women in sexually objectifying ways. This pattern has been documented across a range of media forms see Ward, for a review.

The prevalence of sexualization in new media such as social media and texting has been studied to a much lesser extent compared to traditional media.

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I located just three content analyses of sexualization on social media. Hall and colleagues analyzed 24, MySpace. However, data were collected in the winter, and it is not clear whether time of year impacted the findings.

Horny women in Anderson

Self-sexualization was more common among young women compared to older women. No revealing personal images defined as images including full or partial nudity beyond what one might see at a public beach were found. Together these patterns reveal that young people today regularly see girls and women portrayed in sexualized ways in both traditional and new media they consume on a daily basis. Objectification occurs through interpersonal encounters, such as being the object of a sexually objectifying gaze, as well as through engagement with visual media, for example, viewing the commodification of female bodies to sell consumer products.

For an in-depth discussion of pressures girls and women may feel to portray themselves in sexualized ways on social media, see Daniels and Zurbriggen b. Specifically, the present study investigated whether the profile owner would be reduced to the sexualized profile photo and evaluated on that basis rather than judged by her entire personhood represented in her profile. It posits that when individuals consume media, semantically related thoughts are triggered for a short window of time.

Thus, when asked to report attitudes toward a sexualized profile photo of a woman on social media, the viewer is likely to draw on prior experiences in which sexualized women were evaluated. As discussed below, such evaluations are likely to be negative. A growing body of research has investigated how viewers cognitively process a sexualized target and their attitudes toward a sexualized target primarily women. Much of the existing research has investigated the processing or perceptions of sexualized female targets with less research on sexualized male targets.

Three major patterns from this body of research include the following: 1 people cognitively process sexualized images of women differently than nonsexualized images such that sexualized women are perceived in less human ways; 2 sexualized women are thought to be less competent, have reduced mental states e. Research on attitudes toward sexualized targets is particularly relevant to the present investigation. Further, negative reactions to sexualized images of women may be especially likely in particular groups of people.

In an investigation of implicit associations and neural responses, Cikara, Eberhardt, and Fiske found that men but not women with hostile sexist attitudes made fewer associations of agency to sexualized female targets compared to nonsexualized targets. In addition, fMRI demonstrated men with hostile sexist attitudes showed decreased activation in regions of the brain related to mental state attribution in response to sexualized images of women.

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Taken together, these findings demonstrate that individuals have a wide range of negative perceptions about women or girls portrayed in sexualized ways. Much of the existing research on attitudes toward sexually objectified women has focused on traditional media. Far less research has investigated this phenomenon on social media. It is possible that attitudes toward a social media user, who may be a friend or peer and, therefore, similar to the viewer, differ from those toward an individual depicted in traditional media, who is likely to be an actor, celebrity, or model living an extraordinary life and, therefore, dissimilar to an average person.

Evaluations of sexualized behavior i. The authors concluded that the peer context may be particularly important to interpreting behavior on social media. Two existing studies of sexualization on social media are particularly relevant to the present study.

In an experimental study, Daniels and Zurbriggen a created a mock Facebook profile of a young woman and manipulated whether participants saw either a sexualized or nonsexualized profile photo. Adolescent girls and young woman rated the sexualized profile owner as less physically attractive, less socially appealing, and less competent to complete tasks compared to the nonsexualized profile owner.

Prior research on traditional media indicates that consumption of sexualized media is associated with dating attitudes pattern three described above. For example, in a short-term longitudinal study of Dutch adolescent boys ages 12—16Ward, Vandenbosch, and Eggermont found that boys who consume sexualizing magazines e. An experimental methodology was used in the present study, in which a mock Facebook profile had either a sexualized or nonsexualized profile photo. The content of the profile was the same in both conditions. The purpose was to investigate possible costs that young women might face from portraying themselves in a sexualized manner on a social networking site.

It is clear that there is ificant sociocultural pressure on girls and young adult women to portray themselves in sexualized ways in the United States. Accordingly, I expected men to report that the young woman with the sexualized profile photo is more physically attractive Hypothesis 1 and socially appealing Hypothesis 2 compared to the young woman with the nonsexualized profile photo. Thus, I expected men to report that the young woman with the sexualized profile photo is less competent at tasks compared to the young woman with the nonsexualized profile Hypothesis 3.

In addition to perceptions about the profile owner, dating attitudes were investigated including attitudes toward the profile owner specifically and dating attitudes more generally. Based on Moreno and colleagues findings, I expected that men would be more interested in a committed dating relationship with the young woman with the nonsexualized profile compared to the young woman with the sexualized profile Hypothesis 4 but would be more interested in a casual sexual relationship with the young woman with the sexualized profile compared to the young woman with the nonsexualized profile Hypothesis 5.

Finally, based on prior findings Ward et al. On average, participants reported that their mothers and fathers had attended some college. Thus, participants constituted the sample for Hypotheses 1 through 3, and participants constituted the sample for Hypotheses 4 through 6. Nine participants were dropped from the study and are not included in the sample information described above.

Five participants were over the age of 30 which means the profile owner is not their peer. One participant took less than 5 min to complete the online survey, suggesting that he may not have attended to the stimuli and survey questions closely. Three participants took more than an hour to complete the survey, suggesting that they were doing other things while responding to the survey rather than focusing on the survey.

Participants were recruited through the subject pool in the psychology department at a medium-sized state university in the Western region of the United States as well as through social media posts to friends of a research assistant.

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Psychology students were compensated with a participation point they could as for class credit. Non-psychology students were not compensated. A mock Facebook profile was created for this study. The fictional name of Amanda Johnson was ased to the profile owner. Amanda was a blonde, blue-eyed, year-old, European American woman attending a community college.

All of the content in the profile was the same in the two experimental conditions including the cover photo, work and education, entertainment likes, and friends. Only the profile photograph was manipulated between experimental conditions. In the nonsexualized condition, the profile photograph depicted a young woman dressed in jeans and a short-sleeved shirt with a scarf draped around her neck covering her chest. In the sexualized condition, participants viewed the same young woman in a low-cut red dress with a slit up the leg to the midthigh and a visible garter belt.

To enhance the ecological validity of the study, public Facebook profiles of young adult women were reviewed by a young adult female research assistant to determine the content of the profile. A similar approach for creating a mock social networking profile was used by Walther, Van Der Heide, Hamel, and Shulman Popular musicians e. Finally, the photographs were not staged for the study, but were actual photographs of a young woman, known to a research assistant, who volunteered their use for the present study. The nonsexualized profile photo was her senior class photograph. The sexualized photo was her senior prom photograph.

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